Reblog of the Week

Reblog: Lessons From a Victorian-Era Cat Dictionary

Ever wondered what your cat was saying? If you have, this article by Carla Giaimo at Atlas Obscura might shed some light on the matter – at least if your cat is from the Victorian Era (and with those nine lives who knows, right?) – so go ahead, check it out:

http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/cat-dictionary-lessons-pussy-and-her-language

 

Reblog: 6 signs your novel may be pretty damn good

This week’s reblog (the first in quite awhile) comes from Damien Walter, and has some advice on what makes a story attractive to readers – while this advice probably won’t let you write a best seller, it’s definitely something to keep in mind when you plan your story (and maybe more importantly – pitch and blurb it!)

Damien Walter

Why do readers love some novels, but not others? Often we do hand wavy gestures at this kind of question, while intoning the magic word “subjective subjective subjective”. Yes, different people like different things. But there are a few qualities which many, many popular stories have in common.

There are six core qualities for a strong commercial novel, which I use as signs that a novel might be pretty damn good! I can’t guarantee that every writer, editor or publishing professional knows these, but I can say that if your aim is to create popular stories that reach a wide readership, hitting these markers certainly won’t hurt.

If you find these useful, take a look at The Rhetoric of Story, a short course exploring the 7 foundations of powerful immersive storytelling. Turn to Page 2 below to see the first 3 signs.

High Concept – the whole concept of…

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Reblog: What’s the Problem with Men?

Hello, Dear Reader – it’s been awhile.

My life is finally starting to approach something resembling normalcy, but I will get back to that.
I’m easing into this, so have patience with me.

My first reblog in far too long, this one is from Mark Manson and deals with the struggle of traditional masculinity vs modern society – well worth the read:

What’s the Problem with Men?

Reblog: In defense of my adopted country

My reblog for this week is on a current hot topic – the one of my homeland, crime and immigration – from a foreign national who have adopted Sweden as his new country.
I do not know Neil, but I have at least a dozen friends and acquaintances from abroad who have come to call Sweden their home, and almost every single one of them have expressed views and opinion that mirror what Neil writes here:

Watching the Swedes


Sweden’s reputation is currently under attack and I feel I must respond, however unpopular this might be. I feel angry, frustrated and saddened about recent events. This is my angle….
I am proud to live in Sweden and I am proud, and fortunate, to have received Swedish citizenship. This is a country that, in my mind, builds on equality and solidarity. This a country that tries to do the best for its people. This is a country that stands up and does the humane thing, even in difficult circumstances. I wouldn’t want to live anywhere else.

In some foreign media, Sweden is currently being dragged through the dirt. Stories based on lies and fabrication are spreading. Sweden is falsely being depicted as a failing country on the edge of collapse. This is total and utter bullshit. It is nothing more than the poisoned school gossip trying to bring down the…

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Reblog: “The Nameless Robot”

Check out this flash fiction story from the eminent Brett Savory, written explicitly for yours truly as part of a campaign promotion for his new book – A Perfect Machine:

brettsavory.com

Here’s the second story I’ve written to promote A Perfect Machine, this one for R. Thomas Allwin, who pre-ordered the book, and so won the luxury of being murdered by a robot at my hands!


THE NAMELESS ROBOT

The best day of fifteen-year-old R. Thomas Allwin’s life was the day his mom bought him the robot. It was also the best day of the robot’s life. They became fast friends because everything Thomas needed, the robot provided: friendship, support, encouragement.

Even love.

But that’s where the problems began, and Thomas would come to realize that the day the robot came into his life was actually the worst day. The robot became clingy, was constantly pressuring Thomas for hugs, to open up, be candid about his feelings. The robot loved him, and was just here to help, it would say. Why wouldn’t Thomas just let it help him—all the time?

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Reblog: Trump Knows You Better Than You Know Yourself

My reblog this week (and indeed my only post – things have been busy and I am quite worn down at the moment) is very, very interesting.

I tried the prediction mentioned in the article, and while it could correctly predict a lot of things it did fail on some points by a lot.

But read, ponder, and see for yourself where the world may be headed:

aNtiDoTe Zine

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